EasterRiot

[1]

The next day, April 2, soldiers patrol the entire city and have been given strict orders (“Shoot to kill!”). The arrests continue. There are 200 throughout the month of April.

On April 13, the findings of the investigation are made public. The victims took no part in the troubles. They simply found themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. The soldiers who fired are exculpated because they have simply performed their duty in suppressing a riot. The troubles are due to the lack of judgment of the federal police, the spotters, who arrested people for no good reason and who set fire to the powder.

The families of the victims, although having applied, have never been compensated. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89meute_de_Qu%C3%A9bec_(1918)

Eighty years later, a flower with human petals rises in this place at the top of a monumental sculpture. It symbolizes the life of which we find the power in the spontaneous movement of a people who stands up to defend their convictions and that we discover so fragile also when the death arrives violently, as it was, that spring, for four Quebecers. Honoré Bergeron, 49, carpenter Alexandre Bussières, 25, mechanic Georges Demeule, 14, shoemaker and machinist Joseph-Édouard Tremblay, 20, a student at École technique

[2]

This flower, thus deposited, testifies to the respect inspires to the alive the memory of those who left here their life The work “Quebec, Spring 1918 “, a creation by Aline Martineau, sculptor from Quebec City, was inaugurated on September 4, 1998.

via[3]