RuleOfOrder

Last edit

Summary: some rework, but needs more; moved interesting story about ww2 veterans to homepage

Changed: 1,4c1,5

< If this is the same as as an ordering method or convention then:-
< First
come, first served is a type of ordering convention. In GeekSpeak we say FIFO - FirstInFirstOut. FILO - First In Last Out is another simple one. AFAICS all other ordering methods need some form of processing to give all memebers of a queue their order out of the queue.
< In the film "Looking For Private Ryan" it is implied at the beginning that they have all drawn lots by chance to see what is the order of the poor squaddies have to try to get off the landing craft onto the beaches. The film leaves us in no doubt as to why RandomOrder was really the only way to order this lethal queue.
< While I'm drifting I'll throw in a gratuitous OffTopic but true story. A mate of mine's old man was a D-Day survivor. Truth be told, he was more of a WW2 survivor than just a D-Day one as he had the bad luck to be in the 8th (or was it 9th?) Army from North Africa through to Italy. He was back in the Isles during TheMutinyInRome but that ended him up on a landing craft for D-Day. Like most other vets the first thing he did when the gates crashed down was ditch his rifle, ammo, helmet and anything heavy he could. Jumping in the sea he swam rather than drowned (unlike the poor buggers who DidAsOrdered and jumped into the sea with full kit - god rest them), made it to the beach and sprinted as low and as fast as his little legs could carry him to the nearest decent cover that would allow him a decent chance of survival. There was no shortage of kit once the slaughter was over... Most other vets did the same which is why they had a higher survival rate than the Greenies who DidAsOrdered. In case you think he was a bad soldier I can only say - ask a real soldier and see what he or she thinks... Wars are won by smart soldiers not obedient ones. Credo.

to

> If this is the same as as an ordering method or convention then:
> ''First
come, first served'' is a type of ordering convention. Geeks often use the acronyms FIFO for ''first in first out'' (the same as first come, first served), and FILO for ''first in last out''.
> All
other ordering methods need some form of processing to give all memebers of a queue their order out of the queue.
> ''Random'' order is another way to order elements, often applied to situations where we fear that human factors might skew the selection.
> Example:
In the film "Looking For Private Ryan" it is implied at the beginning that they have all drawn lots by chance to see what is the order of the poor squaddies have to try to get off the landing craft onto the beaches. The film leaves us in no doubt as to why RandomOrder was really the only way to order this lethal queue.

Changed: 6,7c7

< Good story, thanks. As for the title, I was thinking of RobertsRules of Order, and assuming that the Order meant like Order vs. Chaos, or "order in the court!". But I think your meaning is probably what RobertsRules of Order actually meant; RobertsRules give a system for determining the order in which people speak.
< -- BayleShanks

to

> CategoryDiscussion


If this is the same as as an ordering method or convention then:

First come, first served is a type of ordering convention. Geeks often use the acronyms FIFO for first in first out (the same as first come, first served), and FILO for first in last out.

All other ordering methods need some form of processing to give all memebers of a queue their order out of the queue.

Random order is another way to order elements, often applied to situations where we fear that human factors might skew the selection.

Example: In the film "Looking For Private Ryan" it is implied at the beginning that they have all drawn lots by chance to see what is the order of the poor squaddies have to try to get off the landing craft onto the beaches. The film leaves us in no doubt as to why RandomOrder? was really the only way to order this lethal queue.


CategoryDiscussion

Define external redirect: RandomOrder

Languages: